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(Wed) BEST FAST GROWING SHADE TREE. BEST FAST GROWING


BEST FAST GROWING SHADE TREE. OUTDOOR SUNSHADES



Best Fast Growing Shade Tree





best fast growing shade tree






    fast growing
  • aggressive: tending to spread quickly; "an aggressive tumor"





    shade tree
  • A shade tree is any tree grown specifically for its shade. This term usually applies to large trees with spreading canopies. Shade trees are effective in reducing the energy used in cooling homes.

  • A tree in a public place, street right-of-way, or special easement, planted to provide canopy that will obscure the sun and heat from the ground.

  • a tree planted or valued chiefly for its shade from sunlight











Beija-flor Tesoura (Eupetomena macroura) e a Tulipa africana (Spathodea campanulata) - Swallow-tailed Hummingbird and the African Tulip tree - 23-03-2009 - IMG 4101




Beija-flor Tesoura (Eupetomena macroura) e a Tulipa africana (Spathodea campanulata) - Swallow-tailed Hummingbird and the African Tulip tree - 23-03-2009 - IMG 4101





Fotografado em Brasilia, Brasil.

Photographed in Brasilia, Brazil .

A text In English:
The Swallow-tailed Hummingbird, so called from its forked tail, is one of the largest hummingbirds in cities and gardens, but it also occurs in gallery forests, bushy pastures and edges of woods or coppices. It is green, except for the blue head and upper breast, turning to iridescent purple according to the direction of light; it has dark wings and a heavy black bill. The tail is dark blue with the external feathers longer than central ones. It is very aggressive and attacks other hummingbirds that dare to visit flowers in certain trees. Where the flowers are available for many months, the individual is fiercely territorial, but generally needs to search soon for other flowering plants. It flies to catch small insets on or under leaves in the gallery forests or woodlands. The female builds a small cup-shaped nest saddled on a branch, not far from the main trunk in the shade of leaves. Perched on favorite branches, the male can utter long but low chirps. Once in a while, it interrupts these singing sessions to feed, and flies back for more song or to clean the plumage. They occur from the Guianas and Amazon River to Paraguay and southeastern Peru. They can get along with partially deforested zones, but may disappear with intensive agriculture and with the development of treeless cities.

Um texto em Portugues:
Beija-flor Tesoura (Eupetomena macroura), Beija-flor Tesoura (Eupetomena macroura), fotografado em Brasilia-DF, Brasil.
Eupetomena macroura (Gmelin, 1788): tesoura; swallow-tailed hummingbird c.
Destaca-se das especies estudadas pelo maior porte e pela cauda comprida e bifurcada, o que lhe valeu o nome popular. Como e comum entre os beija-flores, e uma especie agressiva que disputa com outras o seu territorio e fontes de alimento.
Nidificacao: o ninho, em forma de tigela, e assentado numa forquilha de arbusto ou arvores, a cerca de 2 a 3 m do solo. O material utilizado na construcao e composto por fibras vegetais incluindo painas, musgos e liquens, aderidos externamente com teias de aranhas.
Habitat: capoeiras, cerrados, borda de matas e jardins.
Tamanho: 17,0 cm
The African Tulip Tree:
Spathodea campanulata
Common Names: African tuliptree, flame of the forest, fountaintree, fireball
Family: Bignoniaceae (bignonia family)
Description:
This is a large upright tree with glossy deep green pinnate leaves and glorious orange scarlet flowers. It may grow to 80 ft (24.4 m) on an ideal site, but most specimens are much smaller. The tree has a stout, tapering, somewhat buttressed trunk covered in warty light gray bark. The lateral branches are short and thick. The 1-2 ft (0.3-0.6 m) long opposite leaves, which emerge a bronzy color, are massed at the ends of the branches. They are composed of 5-19 deeply veined oval leaflets. The horn shaped velvety olive buds appear in upturned whorls at the branch tips. A few at a time, the buds of the lowest tier bend outward and open into big crinkled red orange tuliplike bells with red streaked gold throats, frilly yellow edges, and four brown-anthered stamens in the center. They are followed by 5-10 in (12.7-25.4 cm) green brown fingerlike pods pointing upwards and outwards above the foliage. Each of these pods contains about 500 tissue papery seeds. The tree flowers in spurts all through the growing season, but peak bloom is usually in the spring. 'Aurea' is a rare cultivar with yellow to orange flowers and tends to be a smaller tree.

Location:
African tuliptree comes from the rainforests of Equatorial Africa. It is widely planted throughout the tropics and has naturalized in many parts of the Pacific. It favors moist habitats below 3,000 ft (914 m), but will grow on drier sites and thrives at up to 4,000 ft (1219 m). The biggest trees grow in moist, sheltered ravines.
Culture:
This species loves rich soil, but puts up with just about anything with a little fertility to it, including limerock. It is not a beachfront plant, but will survive a bit of salinity. African tuliptrees need serious pruning after every freeze or windstorm. Gardeners in marginal regions should plan on growing this as a large ephemeral shrub and plant it in a sheltered place where it can be reached by ladders or bucket trucks for regular pruning and removal of dead branches.
Light: African tuliptree will survive in shade, but demands full sun for fast growth and best flowering.
Moisture: These trees grow best with plenty of moisture, but will shed their leaves and endure drought.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 10 - 11. African tuliptrees drop their leaves when chilled and freeze easily, but they come back from the roots vigorously and often bloom the next season. Top growth will be killed at 28-30?F (-2.2 - -1.1?C), but the roots may survive down to 22?F (-5.6?C) or below.
Propagation: In the wild, the flowers are pollinated by birds and bats and the seeds are dispersed by wind. In cultivation, African tuliptrees of











Série com o Beija-flor-do-papo-verde ou Beija-flor-de-garganta-verde (Amazilia fimbriata) e a Tulipa africana (Spathodea campanulata) - Series with the Glittering-throsted Emerald hummingbird and the




Série com o Beija-flor-do-papo-verde ou Beija-flor-de-garganta-verde (Amazilia fimbriata) e a Tulipa africana (Spathodea campanulata) - Series with the Glittering-throsted Emerald hummingbird and the





Beija-flor-do-papo-verde (Amazilia fimbriata). Clicado em Brasilia-DF, Brasil.

Following, a text, in english, from Wikipedia, the fre encyclopedia:

The Glittering-throated Emerald (Amazilia fimbriata), sometimes placed in the genus Polyerata, is a species of hummingbird in the Trochilidae family. It is found in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela. Its natural habitats are subtropical or tropical moist lowland forests, subtropical or tropical dry shrubland, and heavily degraded former forest.

Ordem Trochiliformes
F. Trochilidae
Amazilia fimbriata (Gmelin, 1788): beija-flor-de-garganta-verde; glittering-throstedC.
Este beija-flor assemelha-se muito ao A.lactea pelo tamanho e colorido geral, diferindo pela cor da garganta e do peito.
Nidificacao: o ninho, em forma de tigela, e confeccionado com delicadas fibras vegetais, adornado externamente com liquens.
Habitat: florestas, capoeiras, regioes litoraneas e jardins.
Tamanho: 9,5 cm
CUASO: V,*,4,5 e 7
Beija-flor do Papo Verde ou Beija-flor-de-garganta-verde

A seguir, um texto, em portugues, da Wikipedia, a enciclopedia livre:
O beija-flor-de-garganta-verde (Amazilia fimbriata) e uma especie de ave da familia Trochilidae (beija-flores).
Pode ser encontrada nos seguintes paises: Bolivia, Brasil, Colombia, Equador, Guiana Francesa, Guiana, Paraguai, Peru, Suriname, Trinidad e Tobago e Venezuela.
Os seus habitats naturais sao: florestas subtropicais ou tropicais humidas de baixa altitude, matagal arido tropical ou subtropical e florestas secundarias altamente degradadas.
Esta especie nao deve ser confundida como o beija-flor-de-garganta-verde-africano, um nectarinniideo.

The African Tulip Tree:
Spathodea campanulata
Common Names: African tuliptree, flame of the forest, fountaintree, fireball
Family: Bignoniaceae (bignonia family)
Description:
This is a large upright tree with glossy deep green pinnate leaves and glorious orange scarlet flowers. It may grow to 80 ft (24.4 m) on an ideal site, but most specimens are much smaller. The tree has a stout, tapering, somewhat buttressed trunk covered in warty light gray bark. The lateral branches are short and thick. The 1-2 ft (0.3-0.6 m) long opposite leaves, which emerge a bronzy color, are massed at the ends of the branches. They are composed of 5-19 deeply veined oval leaflets. The horn shaped velvety olive buds appear in upturned whorls at the branch tips. A few at a time, the buds of the lowest tier bend outward and open into big crinkled red orange tuliplike bells with red streaked gold throats, frilly yellow edges, and four brown-anthered stamens in the center. They are followed by 5-10 in (12.7-25.4 cm) green brown fingerlike pods pointing upwards and outwards above the foliage. Each of these pods contains about 500 tissue papery seeds. The tree flowers in spurts all through the growing season, but peak bloom is usually in the spring. 'Aurea' is a rare cultivar with yellow to orange flowers and tends to be a smaller tree.

Location:
African tuliptree comes from the rainforests of Equatorial Africa. It is widely planted throughout the tropics and has naturalized in many parts of the Pacific. It favors moist habitats below 3,000 ft (914 m), but will grow on drier sites and thrives at up to 4,000 ft (1219 m). The biggest trees grow in moist, sheltered ravines.
Culture:
This species loves rich soil, but puts up with just about anything with a little fertility to it, including limerock. It is not a beachfront plant, but will survive a bit of salinity. African tuliptrees need serious pruning after every freeze or windstorm. Gardeners in marginal regions should plan on growing this as a large ephemeral shrub and plant it in a sheltered place where it can be reached by ladders or bucket trucks for regular pruning and removal of dead branches.
Light: African tuliptree will survive in shade, but demands full sun for fast growth and best flowering.
Moisture: These trees grow best with plenty of moisture, but will shed their leaves and endure drought.
Hardiness: USDA Zones 10 - 11. African tuliptrees drop their leaves when chilled and freeze easily, but they come back from the roots vigorously and often bloom the next season. Top growth will be killed at 28-30?F (-2.2 - -1.1?C), but the roots may survive down to 22?F (-5.6?C) or below.
Propagation: In the wild, the flowers are pollinated by birds and bats and the seeds are dispersed by wind. In cultivation, African tuliptrees often are grown from seed, but seed production is erratic. New specimens can be started from tip cuttings, root cuttings, or suckers.
African tuliptree:
The smooth gray bark provides a beautiful background for the brilliant red flowers of the African tuliptree.
Usage:
African tuliptrees are grown for shade, color and tropical effects. The wood is difficult to burn, so the tree is also valuable for fire resistant landscaping. The wood has been used for blacksmith's









best fast growing shade tree







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